Greg LeMond’s 1989 Tour de France winner Bottecchia

The advertisement of Greg LeMond’s 1989 Tour de France winner Bottecchia (in Italian). A beautiful and extraordinary bike.

During 1980’s and in the beginning of 90’s, the size of the front wheels of the time-trial bikes were 650c, unlike today’s bicycles.
Continue reading Greg LeMond’s 1989 Tour de France winner Bottecchia

Greg LeMond Limited Edition Series

Greg Lemond, triple Tour de France winner (the only American to win the Tour), and twice UCI World Champion, teamed up with the French frame manufacturer Time to relaunch his signature brand.

The first three models are limited editions and different only in cosmetics, named after Greg LeMond’s three Tour de France victories: TDF 1986, TDF 1989, and TDF 1990.
Continue reading Greg LeMond Limited Edition Series

Top 10 Cycling Innovations

Bicycles were introduced in the 19th century in Europe and now number more than a billion worldwide, twice as many as automobiles. They are the principal means of transportation in many regions. They also provide a popular form of recreation, and have been adapted for use as children’s toys, general fitness, military and police applications, courier services, and bicycle racing.

Here are the top ten cycling innovations in history that made cycling that popular, funny, and safe.
Continue reading Top 10 Cycling Innovations

Missing the Tour de France Start

Pedro Delgado, the defending champion, missed his start time with 2:40 at the prologue at the start of the 1989 Tour de France. Delgado covered the distance only 14 seconds slower than Erik Breukink, the stage winner. But adding the 2 minutes and 40 seconds at his time, he became the only defending champion to begin the race in last place, 2:54 behind Breukink.
Continue reading Missing the Tour de France Start