Cycling is 10 times more important than electric cars for reaching net-zero cities

Globally, only one in 50 new cars were fully electric in 2020, and one in 14 in the UK. Sounds impressive, but even if all new cars were electric now, it would still take 15-20 years to replace the world’s fossil fuel car fleet. The emission savings from replacing all those internal combustion engines with …

Virtual Tour de France shows how esports has come of age during the lockdown

Andy Miah, University of Salford Elite sports events are still largely closed to the world – but July 2020 has still been an unprecedented month for the global sporting calendar thanks to the world’s first Virtual Tour de France, which – despite the name – was based nowhere in particular, as riders took part from …

Mountain bikers can strengthen the connection between humans, nature and recreational space

Jim Cherrington, Sheffield Hallam University Lockdown and socialising restrictions have led to many people increasingly appreciating the great outdoors. In many areas there has been a sharp increase in the number of people out cycling and walking every day.

Road Safety: switch to cycling to keep others safe

Rachel Aldred, University of Westminster and James Woodcock, University of Cambridge Analysis from the UK Department for Transport compares the risk of being injured when you are cycling, driving or walking. Motorcyclists have an especially high risk of death, followed by pedestrians and cyclists. Those in vans, buses or lorries are safest.

The lure of cycling: tips from a middle-aged man in Lycra

Tim Olds, University of South Australia I confess, I’m a MAMIL (Middle-Aged Man in Lycra). In fact, at my stage of life, I’m a SMILEY (Senior Male in Lycra/Elastane, Yo). Like most forms of physical activity, cycling is good for you. Just two hours of easy cycling each week – or one hour flat out …

The strange biomechanics of riding – and balancing – a bicycle

Stephen Cain, University of Michigan Humans have been riding bicycle-like machines for close to 200 years, beginning with the Draisine or “velocipede” in 1817. While riding and balancing a bicycle can seem simple and effortless, the actual control process used by a human rider is still somewhat of a mystery. Using mathematical equations, researchers have …

Stop that car, and plan cities around bikes to make cycling a real option for more women

Katja Leyendecker, Northumbria University, Newcastle Growing up in North Germany, cycling was my main means of transport, as would be usual for residents. When I moved to Newcastle, northern England in 1996, I stopped. The clear cycle paths I was used to in Germany simply didn’t exist and I didn’t feel safe. But slowly I …