Giro d’Italia 2014 stage 12 is a 41.9 km Individual Time Trial (ITT) from Barbaresco to Barolo. Both Barbaresco and Barolo comunes are famous for their vineyards.

Giro d’Italia 2014 stage 12 quick info

  • DATE: May 22, 2014, Thursday
  • STAGE TYPE: Individual Time Trial (ITT)
  • START-FINISH: Barbaresco (262m) > Barolo (24m)
  • LENGTH OF THE COURSE: 41.9 km
  • DIFFICULTY: 4-star

Giro d’Italia 2014 stage 12 profile

Giro d'Italia 2014 stage 12 profile (new)
Giro d’Italia 2014 stage 12 profile

Last kilometers

Giro d'Italia 2014 stage 12 last kms
Giro d’Italia 2014 stage 12 last kilometers

Giro d’Italia 2014 stage 12 map

Giro d'Italia 2014 stage 12 map (new)
Giro d’Italia 2014 stage 12 map (new)

Start: Barbaresco

Barbaresco
Vineyards and hillsides near the comune of Barbaresco.

Barbaresco is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Cuneo in the Italian region Piedmont, located about 50 km southeast of Turin and about 60 km northeast of Cuneo. As of 31 December 2004, it had a population of 656.

Finish: Barolo

Barolo
The village and castle of Barolo

Barolo is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Cuneo in the Italian region Piedmont, located about 50 km southeast of Turin and about 40 km northeast of Cuneo. As of April 30, 2009, it had a population of 750.

Despite being made from the same grape and produced in neighboring areas less than 10 miles from each other, the wines of Barbaresco and Barolo do have some distinct differences.

Located south of the river Tanaro, the Barbaresco zone receives a slight maritime influence which allows Nebbiolo to ripen here a little earlier than it does in the Barolo zone. This allows the grape to get to fermentation earlier with a shorter maceration time.

The early tannins in a young Barbaresco are not quite as harsh as Barolo and under DOCG rules it is allowed to age for a year less than Barolo. The Barolo wines that tend to be closer in body, fruitiness, and perfume to Barbaresco wines are generally the ones produced near the villages of La Morra and Barolo.

The most pronounced difference between the two wines is that the tannins of Barbaresco tend to soften quicker, which can make the wines more approachable to drink at an earlier age but won’t allow it to age for as long as a traditionally made Barolo could.

The smaller vineyard areas mean that the annual production of Barbaresco is around 35% of the production of Barolo and therefore the wines are not as widely available out on the market. However, the smaller area does generally produce more consistent profiles among the Barbarescos than across the more expansive Barolo zone.

Sources

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