Giro d'Italia 2016

A Short Giro d’Italia History with Numbers

The Giro d’Italia is the first of the three grand tours in calendar, and generally regarded as the second most important race in cycling. Here is a short history of Giro with numbers. Overall winners, mountain, points, young rider and team classifications.

Luigi Ganna
The first winner of the Giro d’Italia (1909) was Luigi Ganna.
  • Total editions: 99
  • Most winners: Alfredo Binda, Fausto Coppi, Eddy Merckx (5 wins each)
  • Winners from 12 countries: Italy (68 wins), Belgium (7 wins), France (6 wins), Spain, Switzerland and Russia (3 wins), Luxembourg (2 wins), Colombia, USA, Sweden, Ireland, Canada (1 win).
  • Most stage wins: 42 (Mario Cipollini). The Italian sprinter only just managed to pass Alfredo Binda’s 41, but the pair is a long way ahead of third placed Learco Guerra’s 31.
  • Most days in maglia rosa: Eddy Merckx (79 stages), with Alfredo Binda having worn the pink jersey on 61 occasions.
  • The first crash: 1909 – the Giro wasn’t even two kilometers old before the first mass crash occurred. A little girl stepped into the road, bringing down a group of riders.
  • The fastest edition: 2010 (39.707 km/h), won by Ivan Basso
  • The slowest edition: 1914 (23.370 km/h), won by Alfonso Calzolari
  • The longest edition: 1954 (4,337 km), won by Carlo Clerici
  • The shortest edition: 1912 (2,443.7 km), won by Team Atala[1]
  • The first non-Italian, and also non-Catholic winner: 1950, Hugo Koblet (Switzerland)
  • The longest breakaway: 1914 – in the 430 km fourth stage from Lucca to Rome (the longest stage in Giro history), 24-year-old Lauro Bordin broke away and rode an insane 350 km alone – 14 hour solo effort. The bunch caught him 80 km from the finish.
  • The longest successful breakaway: 1976 – 11th stage, Antonio Menendez. A name many will never have heard, the Spanish rider rode off the front at the start of the 222-kilometer-long stage from Terni to Gabicce Mare, and wasn’t seen by another rider again until they met him at the finish line. Menendez won the stage in 5hr 35min 47sec, and 12min 47sec ahead of the second finisher, Rik van Linden.
  • The first individual time trial: 1933 – Alfredo Binda won the 62-kilometer trip from Bologna to Ferrara.
  • The biggest number of starters: 298 (1928)
  • The smallest number of starters: 56 (1912)
  • The smallest number of finishers: 8 (1914)
  • The only woman to race: Alfonsina Strada (1924)
  • Longest average stage lengths: 395.25 km (1914 – total of 3,162 km in eight stages)
  • Longest stage: 430 km. 1914, stage 4 – from Lucca to Rome.
  • The Maglia rosa, leaders’ pink jersey, has been awarded since the 1931 edition. The jersey’s colour is derived from the pink pages of sponsor La Gazzetta dello Sport.
  • The narrowest winning margin: in 1948, just 11 seconds separated race winner Fiorenzo Magni and the second finisher Ezio Cecchi.
  • The youngest winner: Fausto Coppi (1940), 20 years, eight months and 25 days.
  • The oldest winner: Fiorenzo Magni (1955), 34 years, six months
  • Most stage wins in a single event: Alfredo Binda (12 victories out of the 15 stages in 1927).
  • The Giro has been led from start to finish on four occasions: Costante Girardengo was the first in 1919 followed by Alfredo Binda in 1927. Nearly half a century would pass before Eddy Merckx repeated the feat in 1973 and then Gianni Bugno became the latest in 1990.

Climber: “Gran Premio della Montagna” (GPM) was made a seprate classification in 1933, The leader in the GPM started wearing a green jersey in 1974. The jersey color is blue since 2012, because the classification’s sponsor, Banca Mediolanum, uses blue as its corporate color.

Points: The first two editions of the Giro were determined by points (adding up placings – read the article titled The hidden winner of two Giri d’Italia). A separate points classification was established in 1966 (though there is a points result for 1958) and the next two years the leader in the points classification was given a red jersey. From 1969 to 2009 it was purple (cyclamen, to be exact) and in 2010 it became red again.

Young Rider: Awarded to the rider with the best General Classication time who had not reached his 25th birthday by January 1. While there was a Young Rider classification in the 1930s, the category got its offical start in 1976. From 1995 to 2006 there was no young rider prize.

Team: Currently calculated by adding up the times of the three best riders of each team per stage.

There was a black jersey (maglia nera) between 1496 and 1951: it was awarded as a symbolic prize given to the last man to finish the race within the time limit.

Year Overall Mountains Points Youth Team
1909
Luigi Ganna
1910
Carlo Galetti
1911
Carlo Galetti (2)
1912
Team Atala[1]
1913
Carlo Oriani
1914
Alfonso Calzolari
1915 NO RACE (1st World War)
1916 NO RACE (1st World War)
1917 NO RACE (1st World War)
1918 NO RACE (1st World War)
1919
Costante Girardengo
1920
Gaetano Belloni
1921
Giovanni Brunero
1922
Giovanni Brunero (2)
1923
Costante Girardengo (2)
1924
Giuseppe Enrici
1925
Alfredo Binda
1926
Giovanni Brunero (3)
1927
Alfredo Binda (2)
1928
Alfredo Binda (3)
1929
Alfredo Binda (4)
1930
Luigi Marchisio
1931
Francesco Camusso
1932
Antonio Pesenti
1933
Alfredo Binda (5)
Alfredo Binda
Legnano
1934
Learco Guerra
Remo Bertoni
Gloria
1935
Vasco Bergamaschi
Gino Bartali
Fréjus
1936
Gino Bartali
Gino Bartali (2)
Legnano
1937
Gino Bartali (2)
Gino Bartali (3)
Fréjus
1938
Giovanni Valetti
Giovanni Valetti
Gloria-Ambrosiana
1939
Giovanni Valetti (2)
Gino Bartali (4)
Fréjus
1940
Fausto Coppi
Gino Bartali (5)
Gloria
1941 NO RACE (2nd World War)
1942 NO RACE (2nd World War)
1943 NO RACE (2nd World War)
1944 NO RACE (2nd World War)
1945 NO RACE (2nd World War)
1946
Gino Bartali (3)
Gino Bartali (6)
Benotto
1947
Fausto Coppi (2)
Gino Bartali (7)
Welter
1948
Fiorenzo Magni
Fausto Coppi
Wilier-Triestina
1949
Fausto Coppi (3)
Fausto Coppi (2)
Wilier-Triestina
1950
Hugo Koblet
Hugo Koblet
Fréjus
1951
Fiorenzo Magni (2)
Louison Bobet
Taurea
1952
Fausto Coppi (4)
Raphaël Géminiani
Bianchi
1953
Fausto Coppi (5)
Pasquale Fornara
Ganna-Ursus
1954
Carlo Clerici
Fausto Coppi (3)
Team Girardengo
1955
Fiorenzo Magni (3)
Gastone Nencini
Team Atala
1956
Charly Gaul
Dolomites: Charly Gaul
Apennines: Federico Bahamontes
Stelvio: Aurelio Del Rio
Atala-Pirelli
1957
Gastone Nencini
Raphaël Géminiani (2)
Legnano
1958
Ercole Baldini
Jean Brankart
Miguel Poblet
Carpano
1959
Charly Gaul (2)
Charly Gaul (2)
Atala
1960
Jacques Anquetil
Rik van Looy
Ignis
1961
Arnaldo Pambianco
Vito Taccone
Faema
1962
Franco Balmamion
Angelino Soler
Faema
1963
Franco Balmamion (2)
Vito Taccone (2)
Carpano
1964
Jacques Anquetil (2)
Franco Bitossi
St. Raphaël
1965
Vittorio Adorni
Franco Bitossi (2)
Salvarani
1966
Gianni Motta
Franco Bitossi (3)
Gianni Motta
Molteni
1967
Felice Gimondi
Aurelio González
Dino Zandegù
KAS
1968
Eddy Merckx
Eddy Merckx
Eddy Merckx
Faema
1969
Felice Gimondi (2)
Claudio Michelotto
Franco Bitossi
Molteni
1970
Eddy Merckx (2)
Martin Vandenbossche
Franco Bitossi (2)
Faemino
1971
Gösta Pettersson
José-Manuel Fuente
Marino Basso
Molteni
1972
Eddy Merckx (3)
José-Manuel Fuente (2)
Roger de Vlaeminck
Molteni
1973
Eddy Merckx (4)
José-Manuel Fuente (3)
Eddy Merckx (2)
Molteni
1974
Eddy Merckx (5)
José-Manuel Fuente (4)
Roger de Vlaeminck (2)
KAS
1975
Fausto Bertoglio
Andrés Oliva
Roger de Vlaeminck (3)
Brooklyn
1976
Felice Gimondi (3)
Andrés Oliva (2)
Francesco Moser
Alfio Vandi
Brooklyn
1977
Michel Pollentier
Faustino Fernández
Francesco Moser (2)
Mario Beccia
Flandria
1978
Johan De Muynck
Ueli Sutter
Francesco Moser (3)
Roberto Visentini
Bianchi
1979
Giuseppe Saronni
Claudio Bortolotto
Giuseppe Saronni
Silvio Contini
Sanson
1980
Bernard Hinault
Claudio Bortolotto (2)
Giuseppe Saronni (2)
Tommy Prim
Bianchi
1981
Giovanni Battaglin
Claudio Bortolotto (3)
Giuseppe Saronni (3)
Giuseppe Faraca
Bianchi
1982
Bernard Hinault (2)
Lucien van Impe
Francesco Moser (4)
Marco Groppo
Bianchi
1983
Giuseppe Saronni (2)
Lucien van Impe (2)
Giuseppe Saronni (4)
Franco Chioccioli
Gemeaz Cusin-Zor
1984
Francesco Moser
Laurent Fignon
Urs Freuler
Charly Mottet
Renault-Elf
1985
Bernard Hinault (3)
José Luis Navarro
Johan Van der Velde
Alberto Volpi
Apilatte-Olmo-Cierre
1986
Roberto Visentini
Pedro Muñoz
Guido Bontempi
Marco Giovannetti
Super Mercati Brianzoli
1987
Stephen Roche
Robert Millar
Johan Van der Velde (2)
Roberto Conti
Panasonic
1988
Andrew Hampsten
Andrew Hampsten
Johan Van der Velde (3)
Stefano Tomasini
Carrera
1989
Laurent Fignon
Luis Herrera
Giovanni Fidanza
Vladimir Poulnikov
Fagor
1990
Gianni Bugno
Claudio Chiapucci
Gianni Bugno
Vladimir Poulnikov (2)
ONCE
1991
Franco Chioccioli
Iñaki Gastón
Claudio Chiapucci
Massimiliano Lelli
Carrera
1992
Miguel Indurain
Claudio Chiapucci (2)
Mario Cipollini
Pavel Tonkov
GB-MG
1993
Miguel Indurain (2)
Claudio Chiappucci (3)
Adriano Baffi
Pavel Tonkov (2)
Lampre
1994
Evgeni Berzin
Pascal Richard
Djamolidine Abdoujaparov
Evgeni Berzin
Carrera
1995
Tony Rominger
Mariano Piccoli
Tony Rominger
Gewiss-Ballan
1996
Pavel Tonkov
Mariano Piccoli (2)
Fabrizio Guidi
Carrera
1997
Ivan Gotti
José Jaime González
Mario Cipollini (2)
Kelme-Costa Blanca
1998
Marco Pantani
Marco Pantani
Mariano Piccoli
Mapei
1999
Ivan Gotti (2)
José Jaime Gonzalez (2)
Laurent Jalabert
Vitalicio Seguros
2000
Stefano Garzelli
Francesco Casagrande
Dimitri Konyshev
Mapei-Quick Step
2001
Gilberto Simoni
Fredy Gonzalez
Massimo Strazzer
Alessio
2002
Paolo Savoldelli
Julio Perez Cuapio
Mario Cipollini (3)
Alessio
2003
Gilberto Simoni (2)
Fredy Gonzalez (2)
Gilberto Simoni
Lampre
2004
Damiano Cunego
Fabian Wegmann
Alessandro Petacchi
Saeco
2005
Paolo Savoldelli (2)
José Rujano
Paolo Bettini
Liquigas
2006
Ivan Basso
Juan Manuel Gárate
Paolo Bettini (2)
Phonak
2007
Danilo Di Luca
Leonardo Piepoli
Alessandro Petacchi (2)
Andy Schleck
Saunier Duval
2008
Alberto Contador
Emanuele Sella
Daniele Bennati
Riccardo Riccò
CSF-Navigare
2009
Denis Menchov
Stefano Garzelli
Danilo Di Luca
Kevin Seeldraeyers
Astana
2010
Ivan Basso (2)
Matthew Lloyd
Cadel Evans
Richie Porte
Liquigas
2011
Michele Scarponi
Stefano Garzelli (2)
Michele Scarponi
Roman Kreuziger
Astana (2)
2012
Ryder Hesjedal
Matteo Rabottini
Joaquim Rodríguez
Rigoberto Uran
Lampre
2013
Vincenzo Nibali
Stefano Pirazzi
Mark Cavendish
Carlos Betancur
Sky
2014
Nairo Quintana
Julián Arredondo
Nacer Bouhanni
Nairo Quintana
AG2R La Mondiale
2015
Alberto Contador
Giovanni Visconti
Giacomo Nizzolo
Fabio Aru
Astana (3)
2016
Vincenzo Nibali (2)
Mikel Nieve
Giacomo Nizzolo (2)
Bob Jungels
Astana (4)
Countries:
Country GC Wins GPM Points Youth Team
Italy
69 39 34 14 62
Belgium
7 6 5 1 1
France
6 4 2 1 3
Spain
4 15 2 0 7
Switzerland
3 3 2 0 1
Russia
3 0 1 3 0
Luxembourg
2 2 0 2 0
Colombia
1 5 0 3 0
USA
1 1 0 0 0
Sweden
1 0 0 1 0
Ireland
1 0 0 0 0
Canada
1 0 0 0 0
Australia
0 1 1 1 0
Great Britain
0 1 1 0 1
Mexico
0 1 0 0 0
Germany
0 1 0 0 0
Venezuela
0 1 0 0 0
Netherlands
0 0 3 0 1
Uzbekistan
0 0 1 0 0
Ukraine
0 0 0 2 0
Kazakhstan
0 0 0 0 4

Notes

[1] By 1912 Italy was at war with the Ottoman Empire. Using, for the first time in military history, aerial bombs, the country all but bankrupted itself in wresting control of Libya. The Gazzetta (Giro organizer) formulated a plan which it hoped would enable the peninsula’s soldiery to compete. A great many cyclists had found themselves conscripted to the Bersaglieri and the Giro, patriotic to the last, thought it a good idea to give them a morale boost. They settled on a team classification, each squad comprising four riders, the first three of whom would count towards the general classification. (Sykes, Herbie. Maglia Rosa – Triumph and tragedy at the Giro d’Italia. London: Rouleur Limited, 2011) Team Atala (Luigi Ganna, Carlo Galetti, Giovanni Micheletto and Eberardo Pavesi) won the 1912 Giro.

Sources

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