Tour de France 2017 Route

Tour de France 2017, the 104th edition’s route has been revealed by the ASO, the organizer of the French grand tour. This year, there will be less time trials (no team trial and a short 13.8 km ITT on the opening day and another 23 km on the penultimate stage, total of 33.8 km (1)) and many famous climbs not included the route, for example there will be no Alpe d’Huez, no Mount Ventoux, etc. Instead, they introduced many new climbs. Like the Vuelta a España, some of the climbs will be short-but-steep, and the mountain stages’ length are reduced. These short stages are probably inspired by Giro d’Italia and Vuelta a España – these grand tours have had many short mountain stages in the recent years, which were full of action from the start (remember the 118.5 km stage 15 of Vuelta 2016, where Contador and Quintana joined the breakaway where Froome got isolated and lost 2:37 to Quintana). The shortest stage of last 30 editions of Tour (except the time trials and the prologues), the 13th stage between Saint-Girons and Foix, which is 100 km (62 mi) is another interesting aspect of this years’ race.
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Coppi e Bartali, Bartali e Coppi

Fausto Coppi and Gino Bartali: two cycling legends of Italy. The rivalry between them is maybe the most famous sporting duel in history. It has been started during the World War II, and continued afterward.
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“Froome” descending style?

At the stage 8 of this years’ Tour de France, Chris Froome attacked on the descent. He quickly opened up a gap of a few seconds on his main general classification rivals, including Nairo Quintana. Then he tucked down onto the top tube of his bicycle and spun the 54 chainring with all he had, opening up an even bigger gap in the process. Finally, he won the stage by 13 seconds on his rivals.

A lot of people were astonished to his descending technique. But, in fact, we saw it before.
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Cancellara’s special edition Trek Madone for Tour de France (Video)

In his final year as a pro, Fabian Cancellara got a special-edition Trek Madone for his last Tour de France. The bike is specially painted for him, and it celebrates the Spartacus’ entire career.
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Tour de France Winner Groupsets, Year by Year

Tour de France is the world’s most popular and prestigious bicycle race. Wining “the Tour” is a great victory for cyclists, as well as groupset producers. Here are the Tour de France Winner Groupsets, since 1937, year by year:
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Rohan Dennis breaks the fastest Tour de France Time Trial Record

Rohan Dennis (BMC) beats Greg LeMond’s Tour de France time trial speed record which was set in 1989, at the final time trial in Paris (LeMond won that edition with only eight seconds over the Frenchman Laurent Fignon, the narrowest winning margin in history). Dennis’s time over the 13.8 km course was 14 minutes 56 seconds, clocking an average speed of 55.446 km/h. Dennis also broke the prologue record of Chris Boardman which was set in the 1994 edition, Boardman’s previous record was 55.2 km/h (34.3 mph) set during the 7.2 km prologue of the 1994 Tour in Lille.
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Léon Scieur carries his own wheel

Today’s historic photo of the day: during the penultimate (14th) stage of the 1921 Tour de France, Léon Scieur, the Belgian rider of La Sportive team carries his own wheel to the finish line. Scieur won the 1921 Tour de France when he was 33-year-old, along with stages 3 and 10.
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Charly Gaul on Mont Ventoux, Tour de France 1958

Today’s historic photo of the day: Charly Gaul on Mont Ventoux; Tour de France 1958, stage 18, July 13, Sunday, 21.5 km Individual Time Trial.

A 21.5-kilometer individual time trial from Bédouin – up Mount Ventoux. Charly Gaul, as usual, let himself lose some time on the flat stages, always confident that he could make the time up in the mountains. After the Pyrenees he was sitting in eighth place, 10 minutes, 41 seconds behind Favero. He unleashed a wonderful ride, beating Bahamontes by a half-minute. Anquetil finished 4 minutes behind Gaul, Géminiani and Bobet were 5 minutes back. But Géminiani had the Yellow Jersey again. And now, for the first time in his career, Gaul was a true threat to win the Tour de France. The Alps started the next day.
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